Letter from John G. Parker ll (July 1, 1950)

13 04 2012

Dearest Ann,

Well, how are you, sweetie? Greetings from Cuba! My ink well bottle is boiling so I don’t know if I can get a refill ifin I run out. Its what you would call hot down here. Spect its just right comfortable there in Washington, huh? ha. I was going to write you tomorrow when I had a lot of time but I heard the mail only goes out of her twice a week so everything has to be in before five this after. I was expecting a letter from you at mail call yesterday but no go -sob! Don’t think our mail service here is just the best. I didn’t quite make it to Boston last weekend, wish now that I would have. First off, I couldn’t find anyone to tag along with and then our captain arranged a party for the midshipmen up there so I went to that. We had a picnic down at the beach. It was kinda fun but too cold to go swimming. I’m fastly forgetting what the world cold implies. We docked right next to the naval prison up there -let it’s dark shadow fall over us as a warning I recon. the trip down here was sorta uneventful. I spent 11 hrs on the bridge one day -sure was ready for bed that night. So far we’ve only had one rough night, thank goodness. Boy, it doesn’t take much to have us rocking all around. I can imagine what it wold be like in a high sea. One of our officers was telling me that he didn’t catch but a few winks sleep in eleven days because he couldn’t stay in his bed -kept getting thrown out. Don’t know as I’d like destroyer duty so well after I heard that tale. We sure are starved for news on the ship. We’ve gotten a couple of radio messages sorta of putting us on the alert for acts of sabotage , heard that all the raid antennas here in Gitmo had been cut a couple of nights ago, of course its nothing to repair them, but just the act certainly surprised every one. I surely hope we don’t get into any more trouble over Korea, just might be graduating in January and the ? together yet. I just tore off the ship yesterday as soon as they let us ashore after we came in to the store -money burns holes in my pocket. In the past two years I’ve made three special trips to this particular ship service store and its been closed, yesterday was their monthly inventory, so I finally caught them open this morning-guess they weren’t prepared for such a quick counterattack (ugh – a witticism) blew my wad so I’m satisfied now. Couldn’t find any “Cicero” but got my mother some nice Chanel -her birthday present – a little late for the 14th but I don’t think she will mind too much. This afternoon Bob Painter and I went to the store again, Bob outfitted himself in sports clothes. They sure have so fancy sport shirts -pretty loud. Looked like they might be catering to colored populous. Guess we’ll only be on here until the 17th and then we start back on the cruiser, four day lay-over in Norfolk, and then A-town. Boy it won’t be long now. Sure will be nice to see you again, honey! Been missing you just a real lot! The Missouri and eight destroyers came in today so guess I’ll look up some of the boys tonight and keep out of mischief.-ha. Wish I could push the calender ahead a little. I’ll keep trying every day. Bye now sweetie.

All my love

Jack

 

 

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Letter from John G. Parker ll (July 1, 1950)

13 04 2012

Dearest Ann,

Well, how are you, sweetie? Greetings from Cuba! My ink well bottle is boiling so I don’t know if I can get a refill ifin I run out. Its what you would call hot down here. Spect its just right comfortable there in Washington, huh? ha. I was going to write you tomorrow when I had a lot of time but I heard the mail only goes out of her twice a week so everything has to be in before five this after. I was expecting a letter from you at mail call yesterday but no go -sob! Don’t think our mail service here is just the best. I didn’t quite make it to Boston last weekend, wish now that I would have. First off, I couldn’t find anyone to tag along with and then our captain arranged a party for the midshipmen up there so I went to that. We had a picnic down at the beach. It was kinda fun but too cold to go swimming. I’m fastly forgetting what the world cold implies. We docked right next to the naval prison up there -let it’s dark shadow fall over us as a warning I recon. the trip down here was sorta uneventful. I spent 11 hrs on the bridge one day -sure was ready for bed that night. So far we’ve only had one rough night, thank goodness. Boy, it doesn’t take much to have us rocking all around. I can imagine what it wold be like in a high sea. One of our officers was telling me that he didn’t catch but a few winks sleep in eleven days because he couldn’t stay in his bed -kept getting thrown out. Don’t know as I’d like destroyer duty so well after I heard that tale. We sure are starved for news on the ship. We’ve gotten a couple of radio messages sorta of putting us on the alert for acts of sabotage , heard that all the raid antennas here in Gitmo had been cut a couple of nights ago, of course its nothing to repair them, but just the act certainly surprised every one. I surely hope we don’t get into any more trouble over Korea, just might be graduating in January and the ? together yet. I just tore off the ship yesterday as soon as they let us ashore after we came in to the store -money burns holes in my pocket. In the past two years I’ve made three special trips to this particular ship service store and its been closed, yesterday was their monthly inventory, so I finally caught them open this morning-guess they weren’t prepared for such a quick counterattack (ugh – a witticism) blew my wad so I’m satisfied now. Couldn’t find any “Cicero” but got my mother some nice Chanel -her birthday present – a little late for the 14th but I don’t think she will mind too much. This afternoon Bob Painter and I went to the store again, Bob outfitted himself in sports clothes. They sure have so fancy sport shirts -pretty loud. Looked like they might be catering to colored populous. Guess we’ll only be on here until the 17th and then we start back on the cruiser, four day lay-over in Norfolk, and then A-town. Boy it won’t be long now. Sure will be nice to see you again, honey! Been missing you just a real lot! The Missouri and eight destroyers came in today so guess I’ll look up some of the boys tonight and keep out of mischief.-ha. Wish I could push the calender ahead a little. I’ll keep trying every day. Bye now sweetie.

All my love

Jack

 

 





“If you want to stop smoking…

1 04 2012

“If you want to stop smo….





“If you want to stop smo…

1 04 2012

“..If you want to stop smoking, have a reason and stick by it. I quit chewing my finger nails when I was 13, that took a lot more will power than that to stop smoking.” – John G. Parker, ll

Tues. 9 May 1950

Written on Navy Academy Stationary

Dearest Ann,

Did you arrive home safe and sound Sunday night?

I hated like everything to have to tear off and leave you waiting for the bus,  fact is ..I hated to see the week-end come to a close, it was so nice to have you down! [From Washington, D.C.]

Spect you weren’t just a little tired by the time you got home. Maybe one of these times I won’t have to hustle around so much. I wanted to write you yesterday afternoon, but Bob & I got an eviction notice -so we had to pack up bag and baggage and get out of our room. They have been sanding & refinishing the floors in our wing since last January and they finally got around to  Room 1123. Oh unhappy day! I guess we can move back this Saturday -it sure is an inconvenience coming at this time.  Before we moved I went pleadingto our company officer to switch four half decent rooms that our co. is supposed to have next year for three good ones that the i/c in another co. won’t want next year. We are sorta orphans when it comes to a company officers, haven’t had one in two years, one of the other co. officers has two of us, but we are always running around with torn clothes and dirty faces; he gave his company nine rooms that were designed for three men -one big room and a small adjoining one for the third man, while our co got three, one too small, one on an inside court, and one good one which Bob, Gopher, and I got maneuvered out of. I tried a for a half-an-hour to convince him that we need the rooms something fierce. He kept giving me the feeling that he didn’t plan to do a thing for us, so I kept telling him how we would appreciate how much he was going to do for us -told him it would be just ‘grand’ if we could get good rooms.

They finally got me up in an airplane this afternoon, this was the third time I’ve been scheduled for a flight this spring and the rest have been cancelled because of bad weather which was alright (yikes, one of the those spelling words) all right with me. I told the pilot that I didn’t get the stuff too well so I had quite a pleasant flight, he didn’t expect me to do all the fancies that some of the instructors I’ve been up with before, did somehow I hate to see the ground whirling around -fair weather pilot, that’s me.

Golly, you know, you’re going to make me fat if you’re not careful. I got to thinking what you said out at Mrs.Smiths before you left so I quit smoking for good. Every time I get an urge I grab something to eat -have to write an article for Cornet – “..If you want to stop smoking,  have a reason and stick by it.” I quit chewing my fingernails when I was 13, that took a lot more willpower than to stop smoking.  Ann, I wouldn’t want to do anything you didn’t approve of- I meant what I told you Sat. night!

Hon, spect I’d better square away for the exam in the lab for tomorrow. Be a good gal now and I’ll be seeing you before too long.

My love,

Jack





Free speech rights; Corporatism vs. Individualism

27 03 2012

Recently, scores of muncipalities throughout the United States have passed resolutions condemning the concept that corporations have the same rights as people, as  well as a U.S. Supreme Court decision interpreted as upholding this concept. By doing so, City Commissioners or selectmen, memorialized a formal opinion on behalf of it’s citizens that now links it to the aftermath of a historic and controversial decision. Partisans on both sides agree is one of the most important rulings concerning free speech in many years.

The resolutions states a claim that some free-speech advocates find chilling, rejecting a court decision that affirmed that people gathered into a group –in this case, a corporation —may have their voices restricted in that context.

Supporters of the resolution maintain that the spectre of unchecked corporate spending in political campaigns justifies regulation to protect the voices of individual people from being drowned out. [Would you invite Burger King, Inc. to dinner or a commission meeting or to vote?]

Citizens of the our country now have to opportunity to take a stand similar to the ones my famous ancestors and framers of the Constitution took. It gave to people the rights of assembly, freedom of religion, freedom of speech and of the press, given to people so that the mistakes that had been so evident in the imposition of the colonies would not happen again. Special interests, corporate interest, royal interest, would not have any more rights than any one citizen.  This is the principle on which this country was founded. It is not corporations that are the people, but we are the people.

The resolution is an ambitious four-page manifesto; its words echoing those in the cornerstone of U.S. nationhood, with it’s affirmations that ‘free and fair elections are essential to democracy and effective self-government,” that “persons are rightfully recognized as human beings whose essential needs include clean air, clean water, safe, and secure food” and that corporations are “entirely human-made legal fictions created by the will of the people, and therefore not entitled to the rights that people are guaranteed under the Constitution.

The resolution has passed in 59 municipalities nationwide and 28 states that have made similar statements. It condemns the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. the Federal Election Commission. Proponents of the resolution are expressly support an amendment to the Constitution that wold declare all rights embodied within that document as those of “natural persons only.”

Money, as used in political contributions and other ways designed to impact public policy, is not speech and therefore can be regulated.

The Supreme Court’s 2010 decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission invalidated provisions of a law restricting spending money on political campaigns by corporations and unions.

Section 203 of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, signed into law in 2002, violate the First Amendment with its criminal sanctions against corporations or unions spending money on  ‘electioneering communications,” the divided court ruled in a 5-4 decisions. Electioneering communications was defined in the las as “a broadcast, cable or satellite communication that mentioned a candidate within 60 days of a general election or 30 days of a primary.”

Key to the law the court overturned is the idea that shareholders of a corporation or members of a union who might disagree with the corporate political message would have their dollars used in a way that spread a political message of which they might not approve or wish to be a part.

In my field, corporations don’t move people’s belongings. People like me, move people’s belongings.





Early Parker Family History in New England

22 01 2012
BLOODLINE OF ABRAHAM PARKER

PARKER, ABRAHAM, Woburn, m. 18 Nov. 1644, Rose Whitlock, had
Ann, b. 29 Oct. 1645; John, 30 Oct. 1647; Abraham, 8 Mar. 1650, d.
next yr.; Abraham, again, Aug. 1652; rem. to Chelmsford, there had
Mary, 20 Nov. 1655, bapt. 20 Apr. foll.; Moses; Isaac, b. 13 Sept.
1660; Elizabeth 10 Apr. 1663; Lydia; and Jacob, 24 Mar. 1669.  He was
freem. 1645, and d. 12 Aug. 1685; and his wid. d. 13 Nov. 1691.
ABRAHAM, Chelmsford, sON. of the preceding freeman, 1682.  

Another Abraham Parker of Chelmsford, Mass., was freeman 1690, unless as I suspect,
he had been sworn some years, bef. and was really the preceding. but another of this name was of
York 1680, and sw. alleg. next yr.   

AZRIKAM PARKER, Boston 1662, mariner. 

BASIL PARKER, York 1649, recorder of the Province, and made by Georges one
of the council was d. before 18 Oct. 1651, when admin. was given to John
Alcock.  

Benjamin Parker, Billerica, s. of Robert, m. 18 Apr. 1661, Sarah, d.
of William Hartwell, had Benjamin, and John; and d. 17 Jan. 1672,
made his will two days bef. ment. childr. but gives not names, made w.
extrix.  

DANIEL PARKER, Charlestown, s. of sec. John of Kennebeck, by w. Ann
had Ann, John, and Isaac, and d. 18 Oct. 1694, aged only 27 yrs.  Isaac
was gr. f. of my admira. friend, the late Isaac, Ch. Just. of the Commonw. 

DANIEL PARKER, Barnstable, s. of Robert of the same, m. 11 Dec. 1689.
Mary, perhaps d. of Benjamin, perhaps of Thomas, Lombard, had Patience,
b. 1690; Abigail, 27 May 1692; Experience, 7, baptised 17 Feb.
1695, d. soon; Daniel, 20 Feb. baptised 15 Mar. 1696, d. under 21 yrs.:
Rebecca, 1, bapt. 24 Apr. 1698; David, 17 Feb. baptised 17 Mar. 1700:
Hannah, 5, bapt. 19 Apr. 1702; d. at 13 yrs.; Samuel, 5 Feb. 1704;
Jonathan, Jan. 1706; Nehemiah, Oct. 1708; and Mary, 15 Aug. 1710;
and he d. 23 Dec. 1728.  

EDMUND PARKER, Roxbury, Mass., m. 31 May 1647, Elizabeth
prob. d. of the first Abraham Howe, had there bapt. Elizabeth 2 Apr.
1648, d. soon; Elizabeth again, 29 Apr. 1649; Abraham, 5 Sept. 1652;
Mary, Esther, and Deborah, 22 June 1656, perhaps not all b. in one
[[350]] day; for he may have rem. to Lancaster, where he was propr. 1654.
and there brought these ch. to bapt. and possible had others later. Roxbury, Mass.,
rec. of b. or d. had nothing of him, unless death of Abraham, 17
Sept. 1693 means of his s.   

EDWARD PARKER New Haven 1655, m. Elizabeth widow of John Potter, had Mary,
bapt. 27 Aug. not as print. Apr. 1648, being one or two yrs. old; John, 8 Oct. 1648;
Hope, b. 26 or 28 Apr. bapt. 26 May 1650; and Lydia, b. 14 Apr. bapt. soon, 1652; 
and he d. 1662.  In 1666, 6 Dec. Mary m. John Hall; in 1667, 2 May Hope m. Samuel Cooke;
and Lydia m. 12 Jan. 1672, John Thomas.   

ELISHA PARKER, Barnstable, m. 15 July 1657, Elizabeth Hinckley, sis. 
of Gov. Thomas, had Thomas, b. 15 May 1658; Elisha, Nov. 1660; and Sarah, May 1662.  

GEORGE PARKER, Portsmouth R. I. 1638, may be that carpenter from London, who came 1635, in the Elizabeth
and Ann, aged 23, was serj. gen. d. 1656, leaving widow and d. Frances, who
m. 27 July 1676, Benjamin Hall, beside Mary, who m. Ichabod Sheffield.

GEORGE PARKER, York, Maine? freeman 1652 was constable there 1659.   


HANANIAH PARKER, Reading, Mass., perhaps eldest son of Thomas of the same,
m. 30 Sept. 1663, Elizabeth d. I presume of Nicholas Brown, who ten yrs. aft. made
him an overseer of his will, had John, b. 3 Aug. 1664; Samuel, 24 Oct.
1666; Elizabeth June 1668; Sarah, 20 Feb. 1672, d. next yr.; Hananiah, 2
Nov. 1674, d. in few mos.; Ebenezer, 13 Feb. 1676; Hananiah, again, 30
Apr. 1681, d. in few mos.; and Mary.  He was freeman in 1679; lost his w.
27 Feb. 1698; and m. 12 Dec. 1700 sec. w. Mary, d. of William Barsham,
and widow of Dea.John Bright, who survived him, and he d. 10 Mar.
1724, aged 85.  

ISAAC PARKER, Newton, Mass., son of the first John of the same, m. 4
May 1687, Mary Parker, had Mary, b. 4 Feb. 1689, d. soon; Benjamin,
8 Oct. 1702; Martha, and perhaps others before or aft. he removed to Needham, Mass. 

JACOB PARKER, Chelmsford, by w. Sarah had Sarah, b. 14 Jan. or Apr.
1654; Thomas, 28 Mar. 1656; both with elder brother Jacob, bapt. 20 Apr.
1656; Tabitha, 28 Feb. 1658; Rebecca, 29 May 1661; Rachel, 9 May
1665; and Mary, 8 Sept. 1667; perhaps others.  He d. in few months and
widow Sarah present inv. 6 Apr. 1669.  

JACOB PARKER, Malden, Mass., perhaps son of the preced. freeman 1690, d. 
13 Oct. 1694, aged 42.  His widow Joanna m. John Stearns.   

JACOB PARKER, Roxbury, Mass., m. 3 May 1687, Thankful, d. of John
Hemmenway, had Thankful, d. 19 Feb. 1688, few days old; Sarah, b.
8 Apr. 1689; Jacob, d. 26 Apr. 1691, soon aft. b. Thankful, again 9
May 1692; Jacob, again, 29 Jan. 1697; Mary, 2 Mar. 1699; Elizabeth 25
July 1700; and Experience, 25 Mar. 1705.  

JAMES PARKER, Dorchester, Mass., early, perhaps, as 1630, freeman 14 May 1634,
removed to Weymouth, and was rep. 1639-42, thence to Portsmouth, where he was
invited to be their min. but prefer. to continue in trade, tho. he preach. a few years
went to Barbados, whence a good letter to Gov. Winthrop from him is given by
Hutch. Coll. 155 died on a visit to Boston, 1666.  

JAMES PARKER, Woburn, Mass., 1640, m. 23 May 1643, Elizabeth d. of Robert Long
of Charlestown, Mass., had Elizabeth b. 12 Mar. 1646; Ann, 5 Mar. 1647; John, 18 Feb. 1649;
Sarah, 29 Aug. 1650, d. next yr.  Joseph, 1651; James, 15 Apr. 1652,
(wh. was k. by the Ind. 27 July 1694); was freeman in 1644; and a
grantee of Billerica, Mass., rem. to Chelmsford, Mass., and had Josiah, 1655;
Samuel, 1656; Joshua, 13 Mar. 1658; Zechariah, 14 Jan. 1659; and
Eleazer, 9 Nov. 1660; was capt. rem. to Groton, Mass., and perhaps,
by sec. w. Eunice (Brooks?) had, very late in life, Sarah, again, 12 Dec.
1697; and he d. 1701 in 84th yr.  Butler, Hist. 282, refers to
the will in proof.   

JAMES PARKER. Groton, s. of the preced. by w. Mary,
m. 14 Dec. 1678, had five ch. all b. before their aunt Sarah, as also
were 13 or 14 of their cousins. See Butler.  He was town cleark 20 yrs
a deacon. and after overthrow of  Gov. Andros in 1689, of the Comitttee of Safety.
Hutch. I. 382.  Was k. by the Ind. when all his family were taken by
them.  

JAMES PARKER, Andover, Mass., s. of the first Nathan, was k. by the Ind. 29
June 1677, being an serving as a soldier at Scarborough.   

JAMES PARKER, Kennebeck, Maine, s. of John, with his f. was by the Ind. driv.
from his Island and at Falmouth ,Maine, where they took refuge, were both killed
by the Ind. at the sec. destruction of that town, May 1690.  Willis, I. 65. 

JOHN PARKER, Boston, Mass., 1635, a carpenter of Marlborough, Co. Wilts,
came that yr. in the James. arr. 3 June from Southampton, with w.
Jane, had Thomas, b. 2 Oct. 1635, bapt. 22 Jan. 1637, his with half
unit with the ch. two weeks before Noah, 3, bapt. 8 Apr. 1638; beside
John, and Margaret, who may have been brother from Eng. He living at Muddy
River -now Brookline,Mass., and d. in few yrs. for in 1656 his widow. Jane
had m. Richard Tare, and then sold her house and garden in Boston to
Stephen Greenleaf (Huegonut name change), who came from Newbury, Mass.

JOHN PARKER, Saco, Maine, 1636, the purch. of Parker's Island now Georgetown, on
E. side of Kennebec River near the mouth is by Williamson fondly thought
to have first sett. in 1629 on the W. side of the riv. but his purch. was in
1650. Tradition says he was from Bideford, Co. Devon, and d. bef. June
1661.  By w. Mary he had Thomas, John, and Mary, but all may have
been b. in Eng. tho. tradition makes John b. at Saco, Maine, 1634.  Mary m.
Thomas Webber, it is said, who d. at Charlestown, Mass., before 1695. She was
widow on join the children that year.  

*JOHN PARKER, Hingham, Mass., 1636, says Lincoln, p. 45, rem. to Taunton, of which
with William, prob. elder brother he was a purchaser in 1637, was rep. 1642, and d.
14 Feb. 1668.  Baylies, II. 2 and 282. 

JOHN PARKER, Boston 1644, shoemaker, had w. Sarah, who join. our ch. in
Aug. of that yr. and prob. d. Sarah, who m. 22 June 1653, Isaac Bull.
Perhaps he was the freeman of 1650.  

JOHN PARKER, Woburn 1653, rem,. prob. to Billerica, was there first town
clk. d. at Charlestown, 14 June 1669.But a JOHN of Billerica, the Sgt.
who d. Sept. 1668, leaving widow but no ch. and good est. may in 1652 have
been of Cambridge, s. of Robert [pg. 352] and then took sh. of his f. in the
Shawskin land which was the beginning of sett. at B.  

JOHN PARKER, Cambridge, in the part which became Newton, had
come from Hingham, with Druce, Hammlond, and Winchester, induc.
to rem. by Nicholas Hodgdon, was perhaps, the freem. of 1654; by w.
Joanna had Mary, b. 28 Jan. 1648; Martha, 1 May 1649; John 15
Feb. 1652; Joanna, 16 Jan. 1654; Jermiah, 16 Feb. 1656, d. early;
Thomas, 1 Feb. 1658, d. at 21 yrs. Sarah, 6 Jan. 1660; Isaac, 15
Mar. 1663; Jonathan, 6 Nov. 1665; and Lydia, 15 May 1667; but
the first two were brot. from H. nad he d. 1686, aged 71, hav. made his
will 7 Sept. of that yr. The wid. d. 14 Mar. 1688.  Mary m. Peter
Hanchett of Roxbury, Mass.; Martha m. James Horsley; Sarah m. Sept. 1686,
Samuel Snow of Woburn; and Joanna, m. a Stone.  

JOHN PARKER, York, freem. 1652, kept the prison in 1678, was excus, from military service by reason of
age, still living in 1681, when he took oath of allegeance to the killing as another JOHN perhaps his s. had in 1680.  

JOHN PARKER, Kennebeck, Maine, s. of John of Saco, perhaps
b. in Eng. came to Boston to m. 20 Aug. 1660, Mary, d. of Daniel
Fairfield, having the year before bot. of the Ind. a large tract on the W.
side of the Kennebeck opposite his father's Island,now Phipsburg, had, beside
four daughters, Daniel and James.  He, who may be the one who sw. fidel. at
Pemaquid 1674, with James, was killed by the Indians in May 1690 at Falmouth,
to which they had resort for safety.   

JOHN PARKER, Newport, ? in the list of freeman 1655.  

JOHN PARKER, Saybrook, Connecticut, s. of William, m. 24 Feb. 1666, Mary
Buckingham, prob. d. of Thomas the first, had John, b. 6 Oct. 1667;
Deborah, 31 Aug. 1671; Ebenezer, 18 Aug. 1674; and Samuel, 24 Jan.
1677.   JOHN PARKER, Reading, br. of Hananiah, m. 13 Nov. 1667, Hannah, d.
prob. of Thomas Kendall, who d. 8 July 1689, had John, b. 16 Dec.
1668; Thomas, 9 Nov. 1670; Hannah, 25 Feb. 1672; Rebecca, 18
Feb. 1675; which last three ch. d. 17 and 19 June 1689; Kendall, 15
Nov. 1677; Abigail, 10 Oct. 1679, d. in few weeks; Jonathan, 18 July
1681; Daniel, 30 Oct. 1686; and Abigail, again, 24 Dec. 1688, d. at 6
mos.  By sec. w. Thankful, m. 28 Jan. 1690, he had Hannah, again, 28
Jan. 1691; Rebecca, again, 13 Feb. 1693; Thomas, again, 17 Mar.
1695; and Elizabeth 27 Mar. 1698; and he d. 21 Feb. following.

JOHN PARKER, New Haven, Connecticut, 1668, s. of Edward, m. 8 Nov. 1670,
Hannah, d. of William Bassett, had Hannah, b. 20 Aug. 1671; John, 26 Mar. 1675;
and Abiah, 26 Mar. 1677; removed to Wallingford, and had Eliphalet, Samuel, and Edward.
JOHN, whose w. Alice suff. by hang. as a witch, in the horrible delusion,
at Salem, 22 Sept. 1692, was not of that town, but I think, possibility of Andover, Mass.,
yet Felt, II. 480, has not specific.   

JOHN PARKER, Andover, Mass., son of Joseph, killed by the Indians, 29 June 1677,
at Scarborough, on serving as a soldier under Capt. Swett.  

JOHN PARKER, Malden, Mass., freeman. 1678.   

JOHN PARKER, Salem, m. 29 May 1673, Mary, d. of Giles Cory, had John,
b. 30 Mar. foll.; Giles, 16 Apr. 1675; Mary, 12 Apr. 1676, d. in few days;
Mary, again, 2 Feb. 1678; Joseph, 17 Sept. 1680; and Margaret, 11 Feb. 1683.  

JOHN PARKER, Newton, may have been that s. of Robert, which Cambridge, rec. says,
d. 15 May 1681; but, as [[353]] there was two (2) JOHNS at N. acc. Jackson,
p. 20, one disting. as South, the other as East, it may be hard to determine.
Yet of the Newton, John, s. of the first John of the same, Jackson teacher that
by with, Mary, he had John, b. 17 Aug. 1687; Mary, 3 Mar. 1690; Deborah, 11 Feb. 1693;
Sarah, 24 Mar. 1695; and Thomas, 9 Jan. 1700; and d. Oct. 1713.  His wid. d. Mar. 1715.  

JOHN PARKER, came from London 1671, in the Arabella, but it is altogether doubtful where he sat
down, or whether he had not before living on this side and gone home on business. 

JOHN PARKER, Andover, Mass., son of Nathan, m. 24 May 1687, Hannah
Brown, but I fell uncertain as another. JOHN was of Andover, Mass., son
of Joseph, and neither of these, son of Joseph or Nathan, was likely to be
h. of that Alice, old enough to be hanged for a witch in the fanaticism of
1692. However, the s. of Nathan, named John, had John, Nathan, Benjamin,
and James, of whom the last three says Farmer, were proprietors of Concord,
N. H. 1726, and he d. 1738.   

JOHN PARKER, Reading, s. of Hananiah, by wife, Deliverance (Dodge?-J.G.P.),
had Hananiah, b. 10 Oct. 1691, d. on servicing at Port Royal, 1711; Andrew,
14 Feb. 1693; Josiah, 11 Apr. 1694; Mary, 4 Dec. 1695, d. at 14 yrs; had
a son whose name is not plain, 19 Aug. 1697, who died at 12 yrs; and John,
8 Nov. 1703.  Prob. he was freedom. 1691, living.
 late at Lexington, where his
w. d. 10 Mar. 1718, and he d. 22 Jan. 1741. [All the Parker's of Lexington, Mass.,
descended from subject.  

JONATHAN PARKER, Boston, s. of Ralph, had Thomas, was a
merchant mariner, and d. bef. 1706.  

JONATHAN PARKER, Newton, Mass., youngest son of the
first John of the same, by w. Deliverance (Dodge?), had Mary, b. 25 Sept. 1701;
rem. to Needham, Mass., there had Jonathan, 21 July 1711, and perhaps others
before or after, and another wife, Sarah.  

JOSEPH PARKER Newbury, Mass., came in the 'Confidence' [Capt. John Jobson/Gibson]
from Southampton 1638, aged 24, was a tanner of Newbury, Co. Berks, Eng. had Joseph,
b. 15 May 1642, rem. to Andover, Mass., where he was one of the founders of the church
Oct. 1645, and had more ch. of wh. were Stephen, b. 1651, and Samuel, Thomas, no compos,
and ds. Sarah, Mary, and Ruth, who all outlived him, also John k. by the Ind. 1678;
and he d. 5 Nov. 1678.  All his estate. in Rumsey, Co. Hants, Eng., a. 8 ms. from Southampton,
he devis. to his w. by the last will, made 4 Nov. of that yr. her name was Mary,
and a wid. of that name d. 2 Oct. 1695.  

JOSEPH PARKER, Chelmsford, m. 24 June 1655, Rebecca Read, had Ann, b. 7 Feb. 1656;
Mary,  8 Oct. 1657; John 31 July 1659; and John, 24 Nov. 1660; but the
rec. gives not mo. of the first two, and for the third names Mary; and
Margaret for fourth.  Yet it may seem prob. that one w. either Mary or
Margaret brought all; and perhaps there were more.   

JOSEPH PARKER, Dunstable, Mass., is altogether unknown to me, unless he were of
another town, and tho. a propr. only a temporary residence he had by with Margaret,
as on the rec. of Chelmsford, Mass., is to be seen,  Joseph, b. 30 Mar. 1653; Ann,
2 Feb. 1655, bapt. 20 Apr. foll. d. young; Mary, 28 Oct. 1657; John, 4 Nov. 1660,
d. 8 Oct. foll.; Ann, 16 Nov. 1663; and Sarah, 16 Nov. 1666; as shown
in Shattuck's Memorials; yet I can hardly doubt that confusion between husbands
of Rebecca and of Margaret, in the rec. of their ch. must have occurrance especial.
as each had Mary b. on one [sic] same? day.   

JOSEPH PARKER, Groton, Mass., prob. s. of James the first, had two wives.
Elizabeth and Hannah, the latter m. 19 Nov. 1684, and by them had Sarah,
b. 16 Nov. 1666 or 1676; Elizabeth 31 Aug. 1679;Simon, 27 Aug. 1687; Joseph,
1 Mar. 1689; Benjamin, 3 Dec. 1691; and John, 26 Aug. 1695.  In the excel. Hist. of
Groton, Mass., by Butler, five pages are filled with descent. of James and Joseph.
But Shattuck's Memorials, page 376, does not contain the name of
the first ch. as above given yet supplies two, Nehemiah and Isaac, before Simon.  

JOSEPH PARKER, Saybrook, Connecticut, son of William, m. 3 June 167?
Hannah Gilbert, had Joseph, b. 3 July 1674; Jonathan, 15 July 1675; d. at 8 yrs.;
Sarah and Hannah, tw. 15 Feb. 1677, both d. very soon; Hannah, 18
July 1679; Margery, 22 June 1681, d. in few mos.; Margery, again, 12
Mar. 1683, d. at 1 yr.; Matthew; and Jonathan, again, 6 Oct. 1686.


JOSEPH PARKER, Scituate, Mass., son of William of the same, had says Deane,
from 1684 to 1702, Alice, Mary, Joseph, Judith, and Miles, but he does not fix the
date of any. 

JOSEPH PARKER, Andover, Mass., s. prob. of Joseph the first, m. 7 Oct.
1680, Elizabeth Bridges, widow. of Obadiah, and prob. d. 6 Apr. 1684; and
perhaps his widow m. 26 Apr. 1686, Samuel Hutchinson.  

JOSHUA PARKER, Groton, Mass., s. of Capt. James of the same, m. 22 Sept. 1690, Abigail, youngest
d. of the first William Shattuck, and wid. of Jonathan Morse, had Abiel,
a d.   

JOSIAH PARKER, Groton, s. of James the first, m. 8 May 1678, Elizabeth Saxton
of Boston, prob. d. of Thomas, had Elizabeth b. 31 Aug. 1679; John, 13
Apr. 1681; and Sarah, 1 May 1683; rem. to Chelmsford, Watertown,
and last to Cambridge, Mass., in one or more of wh. resid. he had Josiah;
Joshua; and Thomas, H. C. 1718, the min of Dracut, Mass., to which by his will
of 26 July 1731 he have his Groton, Mass., homestead, and made him executor, MATTHEW,
Boston, d. 19 Sept. 1652. 

MOSES PARKER, Chelmsford, s. of Abraham of the same, m. Abigail d. of
Richard Hildreth, had Moses, who was k. by lightning; Abigail, b. 8 May 1685;
Aaron, 9 Apr. 1689; Elizabeth 26 Dec. 1691; Joseph, 25 Mar. 1694; Benjamin,
14 Apr. 1696; and Mary, 6 Sept. 1698.  

NATHAN PARKER, Newbury, Mass., an early sett. rem. to Andover, Mass., was born
of Joseph of the same, m. 10 Nov. 1648, Sarah, or Susan,
Short, wh. d. at A. 26 Aug. 1651; but by ano. w. Mary he had
John, b. 1653; James, Robert; and Peter; and d. 25 June 1685.  Perhaps
this man may be he who was ent. as Nathaniel, of London, a baker,
aged 20, in 1638, when Stephen Dummer (or Drummer?) brought him in the
Bevis from Southampton.  

NATHAN PARKER, Newbury, Mass., prob. s. of the preced. m. 15 Dec.
1675, Mary Brown, d. of John, says one acco. in the Geneal. Reg. VI.
232, by ano. correct report, IX. 221, of Francis, but both describ. as
of Hampton, and the latter acco. makes her to have sec. h. Eliot.
He had only ch. Mary, and d. 1 Apr. 1679.  

NATHANIEL PARKER, Reading, bro. of Hannaniah, by w. Bethia and Bethia,
b. 23 July 1678, d. in few wks.; Nathaniel, 4 Dec. 1679; Stephen, 14
June 1684, d. in few mos.; Bethia, again, 6 Sept. 1685; Susanna, 29 Dec. 1687;
Ebenezer, 28 Dec. 1689; Stephen, again, 21 Apr. 1692; Caleb, 22
Feb. 1694; Timothy, 24 Feb. 1696; Obadiah, 13 Jan. 1698; Abigail,
25 Sept. 1699; Amy, 1 June 1701, d. soon; Amy, again, 8 Nov. 1702;
and Phineas, 27 Sept. 1704; was freeman. 1691.  His w. d. 23 Aug. 1748,
in 90th yr.  

NATHANIEL PARKER, Newton, youngest s. of Samuel of Dedham, Mass.,
m. 1694, Margaret, d. of Capt. Noah Wiswall, had Noah, b. 20 Jan.
1695; Caleb, 9 Nov. 1696; and his w. d. 30 July 16736.  In Dec. foll.
he m. Mary, wid. of Joseph Hovey, d. prob. of John Marrett of Cambridge;
and d. 28 Feb. 1747.  His wid. d. 10 Sept. 1758.   NICHOLAS PARKER, Roxbury, Mass., came in 1633, either with Cotton in the Griffin,
or in the Bird (both of wh. arr. 4 Sept.) with w. Ann, ch. Mary, and Nicholas;
freem. 4 Mar. 1634, had Johanna, b. 1 June 1635, says the Roxbury. Mass., ch. rec.
rem. soon aft. to Boston, had a ch. b. 14 June 1637, d. very soon; Jonathan
1, bapt. 2 Feb. 1640; Abiel, 15 Jan. bapt. 27 Mar. 1642; Joseph, 26 Mar. bapt.
14 May 1643; but when or where he d. I see not. His d. Mary m. William Davis;
 Joanna m. 5 July 1655; Arthur Mason, the stout patriot. constable; and Jonathan living in London.  

RALPH PARKER, Gloucester 1647, rem. to New London 1651, had Mary
by a former w. and by Susanna, d. of William Keeny, had Susanna;
Jonathan; Ralph, b. 29 Aug. 1670; Thomas, Hannah; Mehitable;
and Rebecca, was a master mariner and merch. and d. 1683;
Mary m. a 1663, William Condy; Susanna m. 27 Mar. 1666, Thomas Forster;
Hannah m. Richard Wyatt, it is said; Mehitable m. William Pendall; and
Rebecca m. 1685 John Prentiss, as his sec. w. 

Richard Parker, Boston, mechanic. by w. Ann had Joseph, b. 1 Aug. 1638,
d. in few mos.; Sarah, 8, bapt. 11 July 1641, was freemand 2 June 1641, and probably
he d. soon aft. but may have had sec. wife for in the book of possessions.
Jane, widow of Richard, had an est.  His d. Ann b. prob. died
in Eng. m. a 1651 John Manning, as second wife and their daughter
Ann m. 1669, John Sands; and Sarah m. Mar. 1659, John Paine. 

ROBERT PARKER, Boston, call. an administration to the children 9 Mar.
1634, "serv. to our by William Aspenwall," was a butcher, possibly came
from Woolpit, near Bury St. Edmunds, Co. Suffolk, Eng., freeman 4 Mar. following
removal early to Cambridge, mass., m. Judith, widow of Richard Bugby of Roxbury,Mass.,
had Benjamin, b. June 1636; Sarah, Apr. 1640; John, bapt. at Roxbury,
in right of his w. 27 Mar. 1642, and I judge him to be the H. C. gr.
1661; Nathanael, 28 July 1643, d. young; and Rachel, who died before her
father. His w. d. 8 May 1682, aged 80; and in his will, of 21 Mar. 1684,
pro. 7 Apr. 1685, he calls hims. a 82 yrs.  The s. Benjamin, and John,
[[356]] he says, had full sh. and are d. so that he names sole heir,
his d. Sarah, w. of Thomas Foster, m. 15 Oct. 1652, and to her ch. after
her. with provision for double portion to the s. Thomas.
See 3 Mass. Hist. Coll. X. 168.  

ROBERT PARKER, Barnstable, Mass., m. 28 Jan. 1657, Sarah James, had
Mary, b. 1 Apr. 1658; Samuel, 30 June 1660; Alice, 20 Jan. 1662;
and Jane, Mar. 1664; he m. a sec. w. Aug. 1667, Patience, d. of Henry
Cobb, had Thomas, 24 Aug. 1669; Daniel 18 Apr. 1670; Joseph, Feb.
1672; Benjamin, 15 Mar. 1674; Hannah, Apr. 1676; Sarah, 1678;
Elisha, Apr. 1680; and Alice, again, 15 Sept. 1681; both baptised in 1684;
but an erroneous date of his d. is given, Sept. 1680.   

SAMUEL PARKER, Hingham, Mass., 1638, may have been of Haverhill 1677; 
but owned land in 1682 at Weymouth.

SAMUEL PARKER, Dedham, Mass., m. 9 Apr. 1657, Sarah, d. of William Holman
of Cambridge,Mass., had Sarah, b. 23 Jan. 1658, d. next yr.; Samuel, 5
May 1659; Ann, 10 Jan. 1661; Sarah, again, 21 May 1662; Nathaniel,
1 Mar. 1664, d. at 3 mos.; Susanna, 19 Jan. 1667; Margaret,
3 Sept. 1668; Nathaniel, again, 26 Mar. 1670; and Mary, 1675;
and his w. d. 19 Nov. foll. and he d. 31 Dec. 1678.  Admin. was given on
his est. 9 Nov. 1680, to Capt. Thomas Prentice and Mr. Timothy
Dwight.  

STEPHEN PARKER, Andover, Mass., son of the first Joseph of the same, m. 1
Dec. 1680, Mary, prob. d. of John Marston, wh. d. 12 Apr. 1698, as did
her s. Stephen, 15 Dec. preced. and he m. 10 Jan. 1695, Susanna Devereux. 

THOMAS PARKER, Newbury, Mass., only s. of Rev. Robert, wh. was one of the earliest
Eng. puritans, b. June 1595, bred part. at Magdalen College Oxford, part.
under Archbishop Usher at Dublin, Ireland also part, under William Ames in Holland,
where he took his A. M. 1617 at Franequer. His father enjoy great favor
in the days of Queen Elizabeth as in 1591 the Bishop of Winchester present. 

him
to the ch. of Putney, in Co. Wilts, while we find that the Earl of Pembroke
had bef. giv. him the liv. of the Hospital of St. Nicholas at Salisbury,
and aft. on surrender of these places, present, him, 1593, to the ch.
of St. Mary of Wilts, with the chapel of Bulbridge anxd. and in 1594
the Queen gave him that liv. of Stanton Barnard, where he, ten yrs.
later, appoint. his own vicar. But from the Reg. of Sir Thomas Phillips
I learn, that seven yrs. aft. he was depriv. no doubt from showing
kindness to those who. like his s. thot. more of k. Jesus than k. James.
This s. serv. short time at the altar in Newbury, Eng. and came in the
Mary and John, Mary 1634, with his nephew Rev. James Noyes, was made
freem. 3 Sept. of that yr. preach at Ipswich, and the yr. foll. was fix. at
N. to devote a bach. life for instruct. an affection but dissatisfaction of people,
to his d. 24 Apr. 1677.  The Magn. III. c. 25 is rather brief in his
biog.   THOMAS PARKER, Lynn came in the Susan and Ellen 1635, aged 30,
young Richard Saltonstall, with his w. and ch. being fellow passeng.
freem. 17 May 1637, rem. to Reading, had Hananiah, b. a. 1638;
[[357]] Thomas, Joseph, 1642, d. soon; Joseph, again, 24 Dec. 1645, d. at 4
mos.; Mary, 11 Mar. or (as ano. acco. has it) 12 Dec. 1647; Martha,
14 Mar. 1649; Nathaniel, 16 May 1651; Sarah, 30 Sept. 1653, prob.
d. young; Jonathan, 18 May 1656; and Sarah, again, 23 May 1658;
beside John was there one of the founders of the church. and many yrs.
deac. till his d. 12 Aug. 1683.  His will of 3 Apr. pro. 18 Dec. of that
yr. provides for w. Amy, s. John, Thomas, Nathaniel, ds. Mary and Martha,
beside gr.ch.  Samuel, and Sarah, and makes Hananiah sole excor.
His wid. d. 15 Jan. 1690.   THOMAS PARKER, Kennebeck, Mass., s. prob. eldest, of John,
the first propr. of Parker's Island, now Georgetown, may have visited Pemaquid,
there to take oath of fidelity in 1674; and John, Jacob, and five daughters and d.
at the Island.John his s. rem. to Boston, and there was a shipwright.  

THOMAS PARKER, Reading, Mass., s. of Thomas of the same, by w. Deborah had Sarah, b. 9 Aug. 1668;
Samuel, 26 Mar. 1670; Sarah, again, 28 Feb. 1672; Deborah, 15 Aug.
1674; Jonathan, 4 Nov. 1678, d. young; Elizabeth 25 June 1681; Abigail,
11 Aug. 1683; and Ruth, 22 Apr. 1686; and he d. 9 June 1699

THOMAS PARKER, Newton, sec. s. of John of the same, had w. Margaret, but d.
at 22 yrs. and his wid. m. an Atkinson.  

*WILLIAM PARKER, Hartford, an orig. prop. 1636, rem. to Saybrook,
after hav. sev. ch. Sarah, b. Oct. 1637; Joseph, d. in few weeks;
John, 1 Feb. 1642; Ruth, 15 June 1643; William, 1645; Joseph, again, a. mid. Feb. 1647;
Margaret; Jonathan, Feb. 1653; David, Feb. 1656; and Deborah, Mar. 1658; but wh. were
b. at H. and wh. at S. can hardly be told; was rep. 1672; his w. Margery d. 6 Dec. 1680;
and he d. 21 Dec. 1686.  WILLIAM, Taunton 1643, perhaps elder br. of John of the same,
a purch. in 1637, in his will of 15 Mar. 1660, being 60 yrs. old, names w. Alice, but no ch. and gave small
legacy to his neph. James Phillips.  His wid. m. 1662, the first Stephen
Paine of Rehoboth.  

WILLIAM PARKER, Newport, R.I., 1639, possib. the same as preced.
but the name is so common, it is very easy to fall into error a. the
resid.  WILLIAM PARKER, Watertown, Mass., by w. Eliz had Ephraim, of wh. the rec.
says, he was bur. 12 Aug. 1640 at six mos. old; and Ruhamah, 19 Sept.
1641; was freem. 2 June 1641.  He was one of the original propritors of Sudbury, Mass.
 

WILLIAM PARKER, Scituate, Mass., married Apr. 1639, Mary, died of Thomas Rawlyns,
had Mary, b. 1 Jan. 1640; William, Dec. 1643; and Patience, Feb.
1649; and his w. d. Aug. 1652; he m. 13 Nov. 1651, Mary, d. of Humphrey
Turner, had Lydia, 9 May 1653; Miles, 25 June 1655; Joseph,
4 Oct. 1658; and Nathanael, 8 Mar. 1661, who perish. in Phillips's Expedition
against Quebec, 1690; and d. 1684.  Mary m. Theophilus Wetherell;
Patience m. a Randall; one d. m. Thomas Topman; and in his
will are also named daughters, Lydia and Judith; and this Lydia prob. was sec.
w. of Theophilus Wetherell, and d. 7 Sept. 1719, aged 67.  

WILLIAM PARKER, Scituate, Mass., son of the preceding m. 1693, Mary Clark, perhaps for sec. w. had
[[358]] Alexander, Joshua, and Elisha, who, Deane says all rem.

WILLIAM PARKER, Saybrook, Connecticut, s. of William of the same, by w. Hannah, wh. d. 27 Jan. 1673.
had  William, b. 15 of same mo. of WILLIAM PARKER of Portsmouth Farmer indulging good Mr. Adams,
the annalist of P. with tell. that he m. 26 Feb. 1703, Zurviah Stanley,
d. of the Earl of Derby, an absurdity that I would not to expose by assert.
of no such name of a d. being found in that ho. without suggest. also, that the maiden's f.
might by the rude boys of the village have in the way of joke, been thus titled, and the
simplicity of the modest history made to prolong the frolic; while the genealogist
felt that nothing print in a book could be false. Such a canon of criticism
has, indeed, never been promulgated as binding, but too often passes as sacred tradition with some,
long after rejection by the majority.  

Forty-one (41) of this time had in 1834, been gr. at Harv. alone, and thrity-eight (38) at all other N. E. colleges.




Overland Stageman: Silas Gibson killed in New Mexico by Indians in 1869

20 01 2012
Silas Gibson was a stage driver with my 3x great grandfather, Matthew Parker, in Hillsborough County, N.H. Gibson may have been a driver for the Butterfieled Stage Line. Another stageman was Billy Ordway, who used to ride over e Denver Mountains, once drove Gen. Grant, Sherman and Dent from Guy Hill to Golden City.

EDDY COUNTY, NEW MEXICO

		    SILAS GIBSON CEMETERY RECORDS

	         Records extracted by Richard Wilkinson
                 Typing by Richard Wilkinson June 2001
                 Submittal by Richard Wilkinson June 2001

GPS Coordinates for this Cedar Canyon burial site are:

32 deg. 10 min. 28 sec. North
103 deg. 58 min. 02 sec. West
Just over 3000 feet above sea level.

A concrete marker was placed over the grave in 1968 by three persons who's names
appears on the marker.  Vic Queen, John and Lewis Means.

The marker states:  "Silas Gibson Killed in Indian Fight 1869"  About May or June
1869.

The chance of just coming up on this site are very remote.  You will have to be
out in this desert looking for it.  Its a very remote and primitive location.  If
you are walking, take water.  Please remember to respect this BLM land and take
out any trash you carry in.  Following oil field roads, you can drive very close
to the site and only have a very short climb down into the canyon and back up
again by foot.  The climb down and up again is short but steep.

The following is an excerpt from an article written by Lee Myers for the El Paso
Times, the date of the article is unknown, but judging from the authors
observations that there was no marker on the grave when he saw it, it may have
been written prior to 1968 because the concrete marker on this grave is dated then:

"... Only a limited amount of inquiries served to tell me that two friends of
mine, John and Lewis Means, old timers locally, were distantly related to the man,
that he had been a member of a party of Texans, with a herd of cattle and several
wagons, enroute to California.

My friends' maternal grandparents, Robert and Deborah Hardin, were of the party,
and their daughter, my friends' mother, Cynthia, was born early in 1870, in one of
the covered wagons just after arrival in California.  As youngsters, grandfather
Hardin had told the boys how the Indians had attacked them, the death of one man
in the ensuing fight; but in the course of a full and active lifetime the account
had gradually faded from their memories until they now remembered little other
than the most basic facts of the tale..."

Author Lee Myers visited the burial site and could not find out anything about
this slain man for a long time afterward.  Then all of a sudden:

"...Several years previous Lewis Means, retired, had gone to Arizona to make his
home and had stored an accumulation of odds and ends in Albuquerque.  Now,
returned to Carlsbad, he had asked his brother to move these effects back to his
re-established home and John had complied.

No sooner had the assortment of boxes been unloaded from John's pickup than Lewis,
curious and reflective, began half absently pawing it over - and there it was!"

"...Many years before there had existed, somewhere in the family, a letter, a
written account of the complete incident, penned by an older and well informed
relative, but so long in the past had it been that Lewis had lost all remembrance
of it contents, had only known in a very dim way that it had actually existed.
John knew nothing whatever of it.

Now that story was told.
Following discovery of gold in California Silas Gibson had gone there, had
prospered, and with a brother had returned east to Texas, where they had persuaded
relatives to try their luck in the land of gold and milk and honey.

The party of 18, men, women and children, with four or five ox-drawn wagons, 1,500
head of steers and 40 horses, left Bianco County, Texas, in May, 1869.  Traveling
by way of Ft. Concho, Castle Gap and Horsehead Crossing, they pushed their way up
the east side of the Pecos to near the mouth of Black River, in New Mexico, where
the Indians attacked fiercely.

The party split, part of the men helping the women to form a fort of the wagons
for protection from the fire of the Indians, the rest protecting the cattle and
horses.  The savages also split, attacking both wagons and animals, and succeeded
in stampeding the horses, their real objective.

Now the Whites were forced to divide forces still further and to pursue and attempt
to regain the horses.  They were successful in this effort; most of the pursuing
party were busily engaged driving the horses back to the wagons but Silas Gibson
and one or two others continued to fight the Indians, trying to drive them away.
Silas was mounted on a splendid horse, a racer; then he and his companion, a
Thomas Shelly, gave up the chase and started their return to the wagons.

Shelly, unwisely, had ridden his horse almost to exhaustion and seeing this, the
Indians pursued them trying to bring one or both down.  Silas called to Shelly to
ride on as best his horse could while he, Silas, dismounted to fire at their
pursuers in an attempt to shield his companion from further pursuit.

This he was successful in doing but the Indians, wily and experienced in such
affairs, killed Silas' mount, then, circling him madly, they were not long in
bringing him down, too, and scalping him.

Silas was consigned to his lonely grave next day and the grave was covered with
rocks for protection against predatory animals..."